top of page

Double Hung Set Sashes Replacement with Invisible Sash Balance Device

Our New System Invisible Sash Balance Device replaces the old Weight and Ropes System and keep your new Windows free maintenance.


Knowing the different parts of a Custom Double Hung Wood Window can help you to understand the replacement process.


The window frame holds the window pieces together, and consists of the head, jamb, and sill.


The side jamb are the vertical pieces of the frame.


The jambliner consists of thin stripes of material the ensure a tight fit between the jamb and the sash.


The head jamb, is the horizontal piece of the frame located at the top.


The sill or stool is the horizontal piece of the frame located at the bottom.


The sash is what holds the pane(s) of glass in place. In single-hung and double-hung windows, the sash moves to open and close the window. In casement windows, the sashes swing out.

The vertical members of the sash are stiles.

The horizontal members of a sash are rails (bottom rail and top rail).

Each sash may consist of one or more planes of glass called lights or lites. If there’s just a single plane of glass in each sash, the glass pattern is one over one. If there are two lites in each sash, the pattern is two over two.

The lites are separated by mutins, which are pieces of wood that separate and hold each individual piece of glass.


A true divided-lite is when the mutins physically hold the panes of glass in place.


The casing is the decorative part between the window frame and the wall.


The apron is the lower part of the casing that extends below the stool.


A mullion is a structural element that fits between two distinct but closely spaced window units. They can be horizontal or vertical.


Traditional Custom Double Hung Wood Windows with Ropes, Pullies and Weights



Before and After :


Old Existing Windows



New Custom Double Hung Window Sets with Invisible Sash Balance Device


We add a VG Fir New Side Jamb Skin 1/8" on the existing jambs, Jamb Liner Balance Parting Beads and Weatherstripping with Wood Stops.


91 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page